Hawk finds home and food at Hood

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Hood College prides itself in being an inclusive institute for students of all walks of life, however, one resident has been turning heads; a hawk has made Hood its home.
Over the last few semesters, this hawk has been a joy to observe by both students and faculty. Perching on campus trees and rooftops, the young hawk can be seen overlooking his home and neighbors. This hawk is most likely a red-tailed hawk, one the most common breeds in North America, with a worldwide population of approximately 2.3 million, according to “All About Birds.”
The young hawk has been enthusiastically keeping the saturated squirrel population in check during its time on campus. According to “All About Birds,” a hawk’s diet includes mammals. Its victims frequently include voles, mice, wood rats, rabbits, and squirrels.
While the hawk can be seen all across campus, it is seen mostly on the northeastern side of campus, including the residential quad, Strawn Cottage, and Carson Cottage.
With its frequent presence on campus, the native avian is the source of conversation for many students.
“I love him,” Michelle Shedd, an undergraduate student and environmental studies major, said. “I love him so much, I hope he eats all the little squirrels.”
Melissa Dryman, a senior and studio arts major, thinks highly of the hawk as well, mentioning she has tried to photograph it in the past.
As spring and warmer weather begins, it will be exciting to see if more birds of prey join our hawk on campus.

College Against Cancer spread awareness

colleges against cancer graphicThe Colleges Against Cancer club is doing more than just spreading awareness. They are looking for a cure to cancer.
On Friday, Feb. 3, they were in Whitaker collecting donations to raise money for a cure.
Cancer is the name given to a collection of related diseases. In all types of cancer, some of the body’s cells begin to divide without stopping and spread into surrounding tissues.
Approximately 39.6 percent of men and women will be diagnosed with cancer at some point during their lifetimes, according to the National Institutes of Health.
While World Cancer Day was Saturday, Feb. 4, the club, which was founded earlier this semester, decided to observe it a day early since no classes are held on the weekend and more people are likely to be involved on a Friday.

According to their website, World Cancer Day was established by the Paris Charter adopted at the World Summit Against Cancer for the New Millennium in Paris on Feb. 4, 2000. This Charter aimed at the promotion of the research for curing as well as preventing the disease.
“CAC is run by American Cancer Society and their motto is all about finding cures for cancer so more people can celebrate their future birthdays. The fact we are selling the paper birthday cupcakes on Friday is because of this message,” Emily Zimmerman said, a spokeswoman of the club.
The number of people living beyond a cancer diagnosis reached nearly 14.5 million in 2014 and is expected to rise to almost 19 million by 2024, according to the National Institute of Health.
“[The] paper cupcakes will be sold for $1 and the donor will be able to sign the cupcake and then we will display them somewhere in Whitaker Commons. Purple is the color representing all cancers, so we ask that everyone wears purple on Friday,” Zimmerman said.
The club was active in Whitaker from 12 p.m. until 3 p.m. selling the paper cupcakes and was asking for all donors to wear purple.

Preview of the third season for Hood’s baseball team

On the eve of their third season, Hood College Baseball coach Cory Beddick reflected on the last few years.
“If I could describe our program’s history in one word, I would choose the word ‘competition,’” Beddick said.
A member of the Middle Atlantic Conference Commonwealth, Hood baseball’s inaugural season was 2015. Beddick, who graduated from Gettysburg College in 2010, was hired as head coach in 2013 to recruit a team for the 2015 season.
Over the last three years, Beddick has raised one of the most competitive – and youngest – teams in the conference; The Blazers are consist entirely of freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. While some might view such a young team as a challenge, but Beddick found a silver-lining in his group.
“The key to any successful team is the individuals it is comprised of. Priority number one was, and, is bringing in high quality student-athletes that can help us build our program into something special. We want to [be] competing for conference championships every year. Our earliest challenge was also a great opportunity. Being a new program, young guys had the opportunity to get experience as freshmen and sophomores. We believe that quickened their development and will enable us to compete at a high level this season.”
When asked what sets Hood apart from schools in the conference, he again brought up the youthfulness of his team.
“Even though this is only our third year as a baseball program, we are probably now the most experienced team in the conference. Even though we do not have one senior on the team, we have many guys that have gotten the opportunity to see the field early in their college career. Within one year, we likely went from the youngest team in the conference to one with quite possibly the most experience.”
His hard work has not gone unnoticed. According to his bio on Hood’s Athletics page, he was named 2016 Middle Atlantic Conference Commonwealth Coach of the Year.
The Blazers are looking to improve upon their 2015 and 2016 seasons, finishing with a record of 14-25 and 16-24, respectively, with seven conference victories in 2016.
“I am most excited to see how our team comes together. We play at least 40 games in about two and a half months. We will face both successes and adversities over the course of the season and it is important that we stick together as one team,” Beddick said, in regard to the upcoming season.
Blazer home games are played at neighboring Frederick Community College, as Hood does not have a baseball field of their own.
Beddick has used this to his advantage, allotting more time for practice and home games, saying, “To my knowledge there are no plans for us to have our own field in the nearer future. However, we feel very grateful to be able to call FCC our home field. We are the only team in our conference that has a home field that is artificial turf. That allows us to get on the field in late February and early March when most of our conference opponents are unable to get on their home field.”
The Blazers’ first home game is Feb. 25, a double header hosting the Catholic University Cardinals, while their first conference home game will be hosting the Alvernia University Crusaders on March 17. A full schedule can be found on the Hood Athletics webpage.
With big goals in mind, Beddick has not forgotten to take it one step at a time.
“The next step for our program is to continue to improve,” he said. “We feel like if we reach our potential this season, we can be competing for a championship in the conference playoffs in May. However, to get there we need to focus on the process which is continuing to get better every single day.”

Colleges Against Cancer sells cupcakes for a cure

 

The Colleges Against Cancer club is doing more than just spreading awareness. They are looking for a cure to cancer.

 

Today, they will be in Whitaker collecting donations to raise money for a cure.

 

Cancer is the name given to a collection of related diseases. In all types of cancer, some of the body’s cells begin to divide without stopping and spread into surrounding tissues.

 

Approximately 39.6 percent of men and women will be diagnosed with cancer at some point during their lifetimes, according to the National Institutes of Health.

 

While World Cancer Day is Saturday, Feb. 4, the club, which was founded earlier this semester, decided to observe it a day early since no classes are held on the weekend and more people are likely to be involved on a Friday.

 

According to their website, World Cancer Day was established by the Paris Charter adopted at the World Summit Against Cancer for the New Millennium in Paris on Feb. 4,  2000. This Charter aimed at the promotion of the research for curing as well as preventing the disease.

 

“CAC is run by American Cancer Society and their motto is all about finding cures for cancer so more people can celebrate their future birthdays. The fact we are selling the paper birthday cupcakes on Friday is because of this message,” Emily Zimmerman said, a spokeswoman of the club.

 

The number of people living beyond a cancer diagnosis reached nearly 14.5 million in 2014 and is expected to rise to almost 19 million by 2024, according to the National Institute of Health.

 

“[The] paper cupcakes will be sold for $1 and the donator will be able to sign the cupcake and then we will display them somewhere in Whitaker Commons. Purple is the color representing all cancers, so we ask that everyone wears purple on Friday,” Zimmerman said.

 

The club will be active in Whitaker from 12 p.m. until 3 p.m. selling the paper cupcakes and is asking all donors to wear purple.

 

More information about cancer including causes and treatment can be found here.